A case report of self-medication with over-the-counter fish antibiotic: Implications for pharmacists.

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A case report of self-medication with over-the-counter fish antibiotic: Implications for pharmacists.

J Am Pharm Assoc (2003). 2020 Jan 29;:

Authors: Burns A, Goodlet KJ, Chapman A, Roberts EP

Abstract
OBJECTIVE: The human use of over-the-counter antibiotics intended for the treatment of pet animals has been recognized as a potential barrier to antibiotic stewardship efforts. The objective of this report is to describe a case of self-medication with a fish antibiotic resulting in delayed medical treatment and provide recommendations for pharmacists practicing in outpatient settings on how to best identify and manage nonprescription antibiotic use.
CASE SUMMARY: A 24-year-old man experienced dental pain and "flu-like" symptoms for which he attempted self-treatment with oral amoxicillin 250 mg daily purchased by a family member from a pet store. The amoxicillin was marketed for the treatment of bacterial infection in pet fish. After several days of increasing tooth pain despite the self-medication, the patient presented to an outpatient clinic where he was found to have a molar abscess requiring tooth extraction. The patient responded well to therapy and was counseled to discontinue antibiotic self-treatment.
PRACTICE IMPLICATIONS: Undocumented use of nonprescription antibiotics represents a threat to patient safety. Potential deleterious outcomes include resistance, adverse drug events, and delays in definitive infection treatment. Pharmacists should screen patients for nonprescription antibiotic use, provide them counseling on appropriate antibiotic use, and educate other health care professionals on underrecognized sources of nonprescription antibiotics to increase awareness of this growing issue. Furthermore, antibiotic resistance should be considered when recommending an antibiotic agent for the treatment of infections.

PMID: 32007363 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]