[A study for candidemia during the six year period from 1993 to 1999 in St. Luke’s International Hospital].

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[A study for candidemia during the six year period from 1993 to 1999 in St. Luke's International Hospital].

Kansenshogaku Zasshi. 2012 Mar;86(2 Suppl 4):6-14

Authors: Kazama I, Furukawa K

Abstract
There were 71 patients with candidemia in our hospital from November 1, 1993 to October 31, 1999. We investigated the 59 patients from isolated species, route of infection, underlying disorders, risk factors, complications, treatment and prognosis.Candida albicans was the most commonly isolated species (52%), followed by Candida tropicalis (11%). Eighty eight percent of the patients developed candidemia from central venous catheter related infections. The risk factors to candidemia included keeping the catheter in place for more than 5 days, gastrointestinal tract malignancies, postoperative state of gastrointestinal tract surgery, administration of broad-spectrum or combination antibiotics for more than 5 days, and under corticosteroid therapy. About half of the patients (47%) had complications, including endophthalmitis (19 patients, 32%), septic shock (12 patients, 20 %). Mortality rate associated with candidemia was 46%. Mortality rate was lower in 20 patients who were treated with amphotericin B (40%) than in 34 patients treated with only fluconazole (50%), but it was not statistically significant. In order to make an early diagnosis of candidemia, taking blood cultures and ophthalmologic examinations are essential, especially for patients who have those risk factors to candidemia mentioned above. If the patient was suspected of having catheter related infection, the catheter should be removed quickly and the catheter tip should be cultured. Once candidemia is found, ophthalmologic examination and systemic antifungal therapy are needed. Antifungal therapy with Amphotericin B should be used for patients with severe candidemia or with candide-

PMID: 23115939 [PubMed - in process]