Antimicrobial activity of cephalosporin-beta-lactamase inhibitor combinations against drug-susceptible and drug-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains.

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Antimicrobial activity of cephalosporin-beta-lactamase inhibitor combinations against drug-susceptible and drug-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains.

J Taibah Univ Med Sci. 2020 Jun;15(3):203-210

Authors: Alnimr AM, Alamri AM

Abstract
Objectives: We conducted this study to test the susceptibility of P. aeruginosa to the routinely used drugs and to the two recently available antimicrobial agents, ceftazidime-avibactam and ceftolozane-tazobactam.
Methods: We isolated the non-replicate strains of P. aeruginosa from inpatients between December 2018 and April 2019. The VITEK® MS system was used for phenotypic identification and VITEK 2 for initial antimicrobial susceptibility testing. We supplemented these tests with determination of the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of four antimicrobials; imipenem, meropenem, ceftazidime-avibactam and ceftolozane-tazobactam. The standards of the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute were followed.
Results: A total of 67 strains of P. aeruginosa, including 38 multidrug-resistant strains, were obtained from various specimens. Susceptibility to various tested aminoglycosides and fluoroquinolones was maintained in 49.3-56.7% and 40.0-43.3% of the total isolates. Amongst β-lactams, the strains were susceptible to the following agents in an ascending order: ceftazidime (32.8%), cefepime (37.3%), imipenem (36.0%), piperacillin-tazobactam (39.0%), meropenem (44.8%), ceftazidime-avibactam (61.2%) and ceftolozane-tazobactam (62.7%). The susceptibility rates of the multidrug-resistant strains to both ceftazidime-avibactam and ceftolozane-tazobactam were less than 35%. High levels of resistance to the new agents (MIC > 256 ug/ml) were detected in 21 and 22 isolates.
Conclusion: Our study shows limitation in the empirical use of ceftazidime-avibactam and ceftolozane-tazobactam as therapeutics in serious infections. Moreover, our data highlights the need for prompt antimicrobial susceptibility testing to guide their clinical usage.

PMID: 32647515 [PubMed]