Antimicrobial Drug Resistance and Molecular Typing of Salmonella enterica Serovar Rissen from Different Sources.

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Antimicrobial Drug Resistance and Molecular Typing of Salmonella enterica Serovar Rissen from Different Sources.

Microb Drug Resist. 2015 Aug 21;

Authors: García-Fierro R, Montero I, Bances M, González-Hevia MÁ, Rodicio MR

Abstract
Salmonella enterica serovar Rissen is one of the most common serovars found in pigs and pork products in different countries, including Spain. However, information on the molecular bases of antimicrobial drug resistance and the population structure of Salmonella Rissen from different sources in Spain is limited. The present study focused on 84 isolates collected in Spain from pig and beef carcasses, foods and clinical samples associated with sporadic cases of gastroenteritis, and one outbreak. The majority of the isolates were resistant to tetracycline (73.8%), mainly conferred by tet(A). Resistances to streptomycin (aadA1-like, aadA2, and strAB), sulfonamides (sul1, sul2, and sul3), trimethoprim (dfrA1-like and dfrA12), ampicillin (blaTEM-1-like), and chloramphenicol (cmlA1-like) were also detected, with frequencies ranging from 12% to 20.2%. Most of the identified genes were carried by integrons, including three class 1 integrons of the sul1 type, a class 1 integron of the sul3 type, and the class 2 integron of Tn7. Two sul1 integrons, the sul3 integron, and the class 2 integron are first reported in Salmonella Rissen. Typing of the isolates with XbaI pulsed-field gel electrophoresis detected a major clone, which was circulating in humans and animals during the past decade, and was responsible for the outbreak. The obtained results are relevant for food safety and public health.

PMID: 26295933 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]