Antiseptic Irrigation as an Effective Interventional Strategy for Reducing the Risk of Surgical Site Infections.

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Antiseptic Irrigation as an Effective Interventional Strategy for Reducing the Risk of Surgical Site Infections.

Surg Infect (Larchmt). 2018 Oct 09;:

Authors: Edmiston CE, Spencer M, Leaper D

Abstract
A surgical site infection (SSI) can occur at several anatomic sites related to a surgical procedure: Superficial or deep incisional or organ/space. The SSIs are the leading cause of health-care-associated infection (HAI) in industrialized Western nations. Patients in whom an SSI develops require longer hospitalization, incur significantly greater treatment costs and reduction in quality of life, and after selective surgical procedures experience higher mortality rates. Effective infection prevention and control requires the concept of the SSI care bundle, which is composed of a defined number of evidence-based interventional strategies, because of the many risk factors that can contribute to the development of an SSI. Intra-operative irrigation has been a mainstay of surgical practice for well over 100 years, but lacks standardization and compelling evidence-based data to validate its efficacy. In an era of antibiotic stewardship, with a widespread prevalence of bacterial resistance to multiple antibiotic agents, there has emerged an interest in using intra-operative antiseptic irrigation to reduce microbial contamination in the surgical site before closure and possibly reduce the need for antibiotic agents. This approach has gained added appeal in an era of biomedical device implantation, especially with the recognition that most, if not all, device-related infections are associated with biofilm formation. This review focuses on the limited, evidence-based rationale for the use of antiseptic agents as an effective risk reduction strategy for prevention of SSIs.

PMID: 30300563 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]