Association between Vitamin D and Candida-Associated Denture Stomatitis.

Association between Vitamin D and Candida-Associated Denture Stomatitis.

Dent J (Basel). 2020 Oct 21;8(4):

Authors: Muhvić-Urek M, Saltović E, Braut A, Kovačević Pavičić D

Abstract
Candida-associated denture stomatitis (CADS) is a fungal infection affecting 60-65% of denture wearers. Its etiology is complex and multifactorial and often associated with host immunodeficiency. Evidence exists that vitamin D has potential immunomodulatory and anti-inflammatory effects. The aim of this case-control study was to assess the association between vitamin D levels and CADS. The study included 32 complete denture wearers with CADS and 32 sex- and age-matched complete denture wearers without CADS. The patients were clinically examined, and the severity of denture stomatitis was assessed according to Newton's classification scale. The serum vitamin D level was determined via the use of an electrochemiluminescence assay. The vitamin D level in the CADS group and control group was 54.68 ± 17.07 and 56.82 ± 17.75 nmol/L, respectively. There was no significant difference between the groups (p = 0.622). Univariate logistic regression analysis showed that the presence of CADS was not associated with hypovitaminosis D (odds ratio (OR) = 1.44; 95% confidence interval (CI) = 0.37-5.54). It can be concluded that vitamin D is not associated with CADS and does not play a significant role in host susceptibility to CADS. This finding suggests that vitamin D screening is not indicated routinely in patients with Candida-associated denture stomatitis.

PMID: 33096916 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]