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Bacterial isolation and antibiotic susceptibility from diabetic foot ulcers in Kenya using microbiological tests and comparison with RT-PCR in detection of S. aureus and MRSA.

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Bacterial isolation and antibiotic susceptibility from diabetic foot ulcers in Kenya using microbiological tests and comparison with RT-PCR in detection of S. aureus and MRSA.

BMC Res Notes. 2019 Apr 29;12(1):244

Authors: Mutonga DM, Mureithi MW, Ngugi NN, Otieno FCF

Abstract
OBJECTIVES: Diabetic foot ulcers (DFUs) often lead to hospital admissions, amputations and deaths; however, there is no up-to-date information on microbial isolates from DFUs and no mention of utilization of molecular techniques in Sub-Saharan Africa. We conducted a cross-sectional study among 83 adult patients at a tertiary hospital in Kenya over 12 months. The study aimed to isolate, identify bacteria, their antibiotic susceptibility patterns in active DFUs, and to compare standard microbiological methods versus a real-time PCR commercial kit in the detection of Staphylococcus aureus DNA and methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) DNA.
RESULTS: Eighty swabs (94%) were culture-positive; 29% were Gram-positive and 65% were Gram-negative. The main organisms isolated were S. aureus (16%), Escherichia coli (15%), Proteus mirabilis (11%), Klebsiella pneumoniae (7%) and Pseudomonas aeruginosa (7%). The bacterial isolates showed resistance to commonly used antibiotics such as ampicillin, amoxicillin, cefepime, ceftazidime, cefuroxime, clindamycin, erythromycin, piperacillin-tazobactam, tetracycline and trimethoprim-sulphamethoxazole (TMPSMX). Thirty-one percent of the S. aureus isolated and 40% of the Gram-negatives were multi-drug resistant organisms (MDROs). There was a high prevalence of nosocomial bacteria. MRSA were not identified using culture methods but were identified using PCR. PCR was more sensitive but less specific than culture-based methods to identify S. aureus.

PMID: 31036061 [PubMed - in process]