Bacterial Profiles and Their Associated Factors of Urinary Tract Infection and Detection of Extended Spectrum Beta-Lactamase Producing Gram-Negative Uropathogens Among Patients with Diabetes Mellitus at Dessie Referral Hospital, Northeastern Ethiopia.

Bacterial Profiles and Their Associated Factors of Urinary Tract Infection and Detection of Extended Spectrum Beta-Lactamase Producing Gram-Negative Uropathogens Among Patients with Diabetes Mellitus at Dessie Referral Hospital, Northeastern Ethiopia.

Diabetes Metab Syndr Obes. 2020;13:2935-2948

Authors: Alemu M, Belete MA, Gebreselassie S, Belay A, Gebretsadik D

Abstract
Purpose: To determine the bacterial profile with its associated risk factors and to identify extended spectrum beta-lactamase producing Gram-negative bacterial uropathogens among diabetic patients at Dessie Referral Hospital, Northeastern Ethiopia.
Materials and Methods: A hospital-based cross-sectional study was conducted from May to September 2018. A total of 336 diabetic patients were included using a simple random sampling technique. A structured questionnaire was used to collect socio-demographic and risk factor-related data. A 10-mL mid-stream urine specimen was collected and transported to the microbiology laboratory for culture, antimicrobial susceptibility testing, and detection of ESBL-producing bacteria. The data were entered into SPSS version 22, and descriptive statistics, bivariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses were performed. A p-value ≤0.05 with a 95% confidence interval was considered for statistical significance.
Results: Among 336 diabetic patients, the overall prevalence of UTI was 11.6%. The predominant bacterial isolate was Escherichia coli 12/39 (30.8%), followed by Klebsiella pneumoniae 11/39 (28.2%) and coagulase-negative staphylococci 7/39 (17.9%). Gram-negative isolates showed 100% resistance to ampicillin, whereas Gram-positive isolates showed a high level of resistance to penicillin and tetracycline. Moreover, MDR was observed among 18 (46.2%) of the isolates and 2 of the isolated Gram-negative bacteria were ESBL producers. Being illiterate (AOR=7.226, 95% CI: (1.478, 35.340), p<0.015), having current symptoms of UTI (AOR = 2.702, 95% CI: (1.102, 6.624), p=0.030), and blood glucose level ≥126 mg/dl (AOR = 2.940, 95% CI: (1.080, 8.005), p=0.035) were significantly associated with the occurrence of bacterial UTI.
Conclusion: The overall prevalence of significant bacteriuria (11.6%) in this study was comparable with some studies in Ethiopia and relatively lower than others. A moderately higher rate of resistance to the commonly used antimicrobial agents was noticed for both Gram-negative and Gram-positive isolates. Health information dissemination should be given about UTI, glycemic control, and habit of drug use for diabetes mellitus patients.

PMID: 32922054 [PubMed]