Candida orthopsilosis fungemias in a Spanish tertiary care hospital: incidence, epidemiology and antifungal susceptibility.

Candida orthopsilosis fungemias in a Spanish tertiary care hospital: incidence, epidemiology and antifungal susceptibility.

Rev Iberoam Micol. 2013 May 13;

Authors: Blanco-Blanco MT, Gómez-García AC, Hurtado C, Galán-Ladero MA, Lozano MC, García-Tapias A, Blanco MT

Abstract
BACKGROUND: Few studies exist on prevalence of fungemia by Candida orthopsilosis, with variable results. AIMS: To study the incidence, epidemiology and antifungal susceptibility of C. orthopsilosis strains isolated from fungemias over two years at a terciary hospital. METHODS: Candidemia episodes between June 2007-June 2009 in a university hospital (Puerta del Mar, Cádiz, Spain) were studied. The strains initially identified as Candida parapsilosis were genotypically screened for C. parapsilosis sensu stricto, C. orthopsilosis and Candida metapsilosis, and their antifungal susceptibility was evaluated. RESULTS: In this period 52 cases of candidemia were documented. Of the 19 strains originally identified as C. parapsilosis, 13 were confirmed as C. parapsilosis sensu stricto and 6 as C. orthopsilosis. Of the 52 isolates, the most frequent species were Candida albicans (30.8%), C. parapsilosis sensu stricto (25%), C. orthopsilosis, Candida tropicalis and Candida glabrata in equal numbers (11.5%). C. orthopsilosis were susceptible to amphotericin B, caspofungin, voriconazole and fluconazole, with no significant differences in MIC values with C. parapsilosis sensu stricto. The source of isolates of C. orthopsilosis were neonates (50%) and surgery (50%), and 100% were receiving parenteral nutrition; however C. parapsilosis sensu stricto was recovered primarily from patients over 50 years (69.2%) and 46.1% were receiving parenteral nutrition. CONCLUSIONS: These findings show that C. orthopsilosis should be considered as human pathogenic yeast and therefore its accurate identification is important. Despite our small sample size our study suggests that a displacement of some epidemiological characteristics previously attributed to C. parapsilosis to C. orthopsilosis may be possible.

PMID: 23680638 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]

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