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BMC Microbiol

Staphylococcus aureus isolates colonizing and infecting cirrhotic and liver-transplantation patients: comparison of molecular typing and virulence factors.

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Staphylococcus aureus isolates colonizing and infecting cirrhotic and liver-transplantation patients: comparison of molecular typing and virulence factors.

BMC Microbiol. 2015;15(1):264

Authors: de Oliveira LM, van der Heijden IM, Golding GR, Abdala E, Freire MP, Rossi F, D’ Alburquerque LC, Levin AS, Costa SF

Abstract
BACKGROUND: S. aureus is an important agent of colonization and infection in liver transplant patients. It harbors several virulence factors that can increase its pathogenicity. However, studies of virulence and molecular typing of MRSA in cirrhotic and liver transplantation patients are scarce.
RESULTS: Here we use SCCmec, PFGE, spa typing, MLST and virulence factors to characterize MRSA isolates in pre and post liver transplantation patients. Sixteen (13 %) of 126 cirrhotic and 15 of the 64 liver-transplanted patients (23 %) were colonized by MRSA (p = 0.091). SCCmec types I, II and III that are generally associated with nosocomial infections were identified in 91 % of the isolates. None of the isolates carried PVL, adhesion factors and fib gene. Only three MRSA colonized isolates carried tst gene and were characterized as SCCmec type I and t149. Ten spa types and five STs were identified; t002 and ST105 were the most frequent profiles. Spa types and ST1510 never described in Brazil and a new spa type t14789 were identified. Nineteen PFGE subtypes were found and grouped into nine types. There was a predominant cluster, which was related to the New York/Japanese epidemic clone and harboured SCCmec type II identified in both cirrhotic and post-transplantation patients. Based on SCCmec and virulence factors the MRSA isolates belonged to NY/Jpn clone seen be more similar to the USA100 MRSA isolates.
CONCLUSIONS: Although without significance, liver-transplantation was more frequently colonized by MRSA than cirrhotic patients. The most frequent SCCmec was type II, and the predominant cluster was related to the New York/Japanese clone. A new spa t14789, and ST1510 never reported in Brazil were identified.

PMID: 26572493 [PubMed – as supplied by publisher]