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Environmental Occurrence and Antibiotic Susceptibility Profile of Listeria monocytogenes at a Slaughterhouse Raw Processing Plant in Romania.

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Environmental Occurrence and Antibiotic Susceptibility Profile of Listeria monocytogenes at a Slaughterhouse Raw Processing Plant in Romania.

J Food Prot. 2016 Oct;79(10):1794-1797

Authors: Sala C, Morar A, Tîrziu E, Nichita I, Imre M, Imre K

Abstract
This survey was conducted to investigate the occurrence and antimicrobial susceptibility of Listeria monocytogenes isolates in the environment of a pig slaughterhouse raw processing plant complex in western Romania. A total of 97 environmental samples from food contact (n = 60) and nonfood contact (n = 37) surfaces were examined with standard methods. The susceptibility of the isolates to 17 antimicrobial agents was determined with the VITEK 2 automated system. Overall, 25 (25.8%) samples were positive for L. monocytogenes , with recovery rates of 23.3% (n = 14) and 29.7% (n = 11) for food contact and nonfood contact surfaces, respectively. All 25 tested isolates were resistant to benzylpenicillin, imipenem, and fusidic acid. Resistance was observed to oxacillin (23 isolates; 92%), fosfomycin (23 isolates; 92%), clindamycin (22 isolates; 88%), rifampin (14 isolates; 56%), trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole (12 isolates; 48%), tetracycline (11 isolates; 44%), and ciprofloxacin (1 isolate; 4%). No resistance was found to seven tested agents: gentamicin, moxifloxacin, erythromycin, linezolid, teicoplanin, vancomycin, and tigecycline. All tested L. monocytogenes isolates were resistant to four to nine antimicrobial agents. These results indicate a high prevalence of multidrug-resistant L. monocytogenes isolates in this pork-processing environment, providing baseline information for hygienists and public health specialists.

PMID: 28221837 [PubMed – in process]

Incidence, Antimicrobial Resistance, and Molecular Characteristics of Nontyphoidal Salmonella Including Extended-Spectrum β-Lactamase Producers in Retail Chicken Meat.

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Incidence, Antimicrobial Resistance, and Molecular Characteristics of Nontyphoidal Salmonella Including Extended-Spectrum β-Lactamase Producers in Retail Chicken Meat.

J Food Prot. 2015 Nov;78(11):1932-7

Authors: Choi D, Chon JW, Kim HS, Kim DH, Lim JS, Yim JH, Seo KH

Abstract
The present study was undertaken to determine the prevalence of Salmonella in 100 chicken carcass samples from five integrated broiler operation brands in Korea. Serotypes, antibiotic resistance patterns, extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL) genotype, and clonal divergence using multilocus sequence typing of the isolated strains were analyzed. A total of 42 chicken samples were contaminated with nontyphoidal Salmonella (NTS) isolates: 16 isolates (38%) were Salmonella Virchow, 9 (21%) were Salmonella Bareilly, and 8 (19%) were Salmonella Infantis. A multidrug resistance (MDR; resistant to more than three classes of antibiotics) phenotype was observed in 29% of the isolates, which were resistant to five or more classes of antibiotics. The dominant MDR type was resistance to classes of penicillin, cephalosporins, aminoglycosides, quinolones, and tetracyclines. All the MDR isolates were positive for ESBL producers, and all but one (with the CTX-M-1 genotype) had the CTX-M-15 genotype. Multilocus sequence typing of the isolates revealed ST16 as the dominant sequence type; Salmonella Virchow, Salmonella Infantis, and Salmonella Richmond were all ST16, indicating a close genetic relationship between these serovars. This is the first study in Korea showing the CTX-M-1 type of NTS and the prevalence of ESBL-producing strains among NTS isolated from retail chicken meat. Our findings suggest that MDR Salmonella contamination is widely prevalent in retail chicken meat, and consumption of inadequately cooked products could lead to dissemination of NTS, which is hazardous to human health.

PMID: 26555514 [PubMed – in process]

Molecular Characterization and Antimicrobial Resistance Profile of Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus in Retail Chicken.

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Molecular Characterization and Antimicrobial Resistance Profile of Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus in Retail Chicken.

J Food Prot. 2015 Oct;78(10):1879-84

Authors: Sallam KI, Abd-Elghany SM, Elhadidy M, Tamura T

Abstract
The emergence of livestock-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) in food-producing animals is of increasing interest, raising questions about the presence of MRSA in food of animal origin and potential sources of transmission to humans via the food chain. In this study, the prevalence, molecular characterization, virulence factors, and antimicrobial susceptibility patterns of MRSA isolates from 200 retail raw chicken samples in Egypt were determined. MRSA was detected by positive amplification of the mecA gene in 38% (76 of 200) of chicken samples analyzed. This represents a potential public health threat in Egypt, as this contamination rate seems to be the highest among other studies reported worldwide. Furthermore, genes encoding α-hemolysin (hla) and staphylococcal enterotoxins (sea, seb, and sec) were detected in all of the 288 MRSA isolates. Nonetheless, none of the strains tested carried tst, the gene encoding toxic shock syndrome toxin 1. Antimicrobial resistance of MRSA isolates was most frequently detected against penicillin (93.4%), ampicillin (88.9%), and cloxacillin (83.3%). These results suggest that retail chicken might be a significant potential source for transmission of multidrug-resistant and toxigenic S. aureus in Egypt. This underlines the need for stricter hygienic measures in chicken production in Egypt to minimize the risk of transmission of these strains to consumers. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study that reports the isolation and molecular characterization of MRSA in retail chicken samples in Egypt.

PMID: 26408138 [PubMed – in process]