Characteristics of Invasive Fungal Infections among HIV Individuals from an Indigenous Origin in Mexico.

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Characteristics of Invasive Fungal Infections among HIV Individuals from an Indigenous Origin in Mexico.

J Fungi (Basel). 2018 Sep 09;4(3):

Authors: Aranda-Audelo M, Rivera-Martínez NE, Corzo-León DE

Abstract
In individuals with HIV/AIDS, 47% of the deaths are attributed to invasive fungal infections (IFIs), despite antiretroviral (ARV) therapy. This is a retrospective study carried out in the Hospital Regional de Alta Especialidad Oaxaca (HRAEO), southwest Mexico, where IFIs that occurred during 2016⁻2017 are described. A total of 55 individuals were included. Histoplasmosis (36%) and possible-IFIs in neutropenic fever (20%) were the most frequent cases, followed by cryptococcosis (14%). The HIV/AIDS subpopulation corresponded with 26 cases (47%), all from an indigenous origin. The incidence of IFIs among them was 24% (95% CI = 15⁻33%). The CD4+ T cells median was 35 cells/mL (IQR 12⁻58). Four cases (15%) of unmasking IRIS were identified, three of histoplasmosis and one coccidioidomycosis. Co-infections were found in 52% (12/23), and tuberculosis in 50% (6/12) was the most frequent. The mortality rate was 48%. The general characteristics of the HIV individuals who died were atypical pneumonia (70% vs. 9%, p = 0.01), acute kidney injury, (70% vs. 9%, p = 0.008) and ICU stay (80% vs. 9%, p = 0.002). In conclusion, IFIs are diagnosed in one out of four individuals with HIV/AIDS along with other complicated infectious conditions, leading to major complications and a high mortality rate.

PMID: 30205586 [PubMed]