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Characterization of MRSA in Canada from 2007 to 2016.

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Characterization of MRSA in Canada from 2007 to 2016.

J Antimicrob Chemother. 2019 Aug 01;74(Supplement_4):iv55-iv63

Authors: Nichol KA, Adam HJ, Golding GR, Lagacé-Wiens PRS, Karlowsky JA, Hoban DJ, Zhanel GG, Canadian Antimicrobial Resistance Alliance (CARA) and CANWARD

Abstract
OBJECTIVES: This study assessed the demographic and molecular characteristics of community-associated (CA) and healthcare-associated (HA) MRSA genotypes in Canadian hospitals between 2007 and 2016.
METHODS: A total of 1963 MRSA were identified among 9103 Staphylococcus aureus isolates collected from inpatients and outpatients presenting to tertiary-care medical centres across Canada. Antimicrobial susceptibility testing was performed by broth microdilution in accordance with CLSI standards (M7 11th edition, 2018). PCR was performed to detect the Panton-Valentine leucocidin (PVL) genes and molecular analysis was performed by spa typing.
RESULTS: Between 2007 and 2016, the annual proportion of S. aureus that were MRSA decreased from 26.1% to 16.9% (P < 0.0001). The proportion of CA-MRSA genotypes increased significantly from 20.8% in 2007 to 56.3% in 2016 (P < 0.0001) while HA-MRSA genotypes decreased from 79.2% to 43.8% throughout the study period (P < 0.0001). Predominant genotypes included HA genotype CMRSA2 (USA100/800) (53.6%) and CA genotype CMRSA10 (USA300) (24.9%). PVL was present in 30.1% of all MRSA isolates, including 78.4% of CA-MRSA and 1.7% of HA-MRSA genotypes. Resistance to clarithromycin, clindamycin, trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole and fluoroquinolones decreased significantly over time (P < 0.0001).
CONCLUSIONS: The proportion of MRSA in Canada declined between 2007 and 2016. In contrast, the proportion of CA-MRSA strain types, particularly CMRSA10 (USA300), continues to increase. In 2016, CA-MRSA genotypes surpassed HA-MRSA as the most common cause of MRSA infections in Canadian hospitals.

PMID: 31505646 [PubMed - in process]