Clinical findings of bacteremic septic arthritis according to the site of acquisition: The overlap between health care-related and community- and nosocomial-acquired cases.

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Clinical findings of bacteremic septic arthritis according to the site of acquisition: The overlap between health care-related and community- and nosocomial-acquired cases.

Eur J Intern Med. 2015 Nov 27;

Authors: Murillo O, Gomez-Junyent J, Grau I, Ribera A, Cabrera C, Pedrero S, Tubau F, Nolla JM, Ariza J, Pallares R

Abstract
BACKGROUND: The site of acquisition of infection may have a major impact on outcome. The health care-related (HCR) environment has recently come under scrutiny. In a group of patients with bacteremic septic arthritis (SA), we compared their characteristics, type of SA, microbiology and prognosis according to the site of acquisition: community-acquired (CA), nosocomial-acquired (NA), and HCR.
METHODS: We studied all patients with bacteremic SA seen at our institution between 1985 and 2013. Data were obtained from a protocol of prospectively recorded bacteremia cases.
RESULTS: There were 273 cases of bacteremic SA (CA: 51%; NA: 31%; and HCR: 18%). NA and HCR sites were more frequent in older and fragile patients. SA of peripheral joints was the most common presentation; infections of the axial skeleton predominated in CA and HCR (24%), and prosthetic joint infection in NA (44%). MRSA and Pseudomonas aeruginosa were mainly found in NA (21% and 6% respectively) and HCR (14% and 8% respectively), whereas Streptococcus spp. was more frequent in CA (30%) and HCR (28%). The 30-day mortality rates were: CA 7%, HCR 18%, and NA 26%.
CONCLUSION: The characteristics of HCR-SA overlapped with those of the CA or NA-SA cases. The HCR and NA cases presented more advanced age, greater fragility, and the predominance of difficult-to-treat microorganisms, while the HCR and CA cases presented an involvement of the axial skeleton, streptococcal etiology, and a lower number of prosthetic joint infections. Our data show that the site of acquisition should be considered when planning diagnostic and therapeutic management for SA.

PMID: 26639050 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]