Clinical Utility of Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) Nasal Screening for Antimicrobial Stewardship: A Review of Current Literature.

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Clinical Utility of Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) Nasal Screening for Antimicrobial Stewardship: A Review of Current Literature.

Pharmacotherapy. 2018 Oct 09;:

Authors: Carr AL, Daley MJ, Givens Merkel K, Rose D

Abstract
There are significant clinical and financial consequences to both inadequate and unnecessary exposure to broad-spectrum antibiotics. As such, antimicrobial stewardship programs seek objective, reliable, and cost-effective tests to identify patients at highest or lowest risk for drug-resistant organisms to guide empiric antimicrobial selection. Utilization of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) nasal screening to rule out MRSA in lower respiratory tract infections has led to significant reductions in duration of vancomycin therapy. The clinical utility of MRSA nasal screening in other types of infection remains less clear. This review describes the performance of MRSA nasal screening in predicting MRSA infection, highlights practical considerations for use of MRSA nasal screening, and provides guidance for incorporating MRSA nasal screening into clinical practice. With a high negative predictive value when the prevalence of MRSA is low, MRSA nasal screening is a valuable antimicrobial stewardship tool with potential applications beyond lower respiratory tract infections. In appropriately selected patients, negative MRSA nasal screening can prevent initiation or guide discontinuation of anti-MRSA therapy. Antimicrobial stewardship programs should develop institutional guidelines to promote proper use of MRSA nasal screening. Pharmacists are well positioned to assist with education, interpretation, and application of MRSA nasal screening results. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

PMID: 30300441 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]