Discovery of the Gray Phenotype and White-Gray-Opaque Tristable Phenotypic transitions in Candida dubliniensis.

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Discovery of the Gray Phenotype and White-Gray-Opaque Tristable Phenotypic transitions in Candida dubliniensis.

Virulence. 2015 Dec 29;:0

Authors: Yue H, Hu J, Guan G, Tao L, Du H, Li H, Huang G

Abstract
Candida dubliniensis is closely related to Candida albicans, a major causative agent of candidiasis, and is primarily associated with oral colonization and infection in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-positive patients. Despite the high similarity of genomic and phenotypic features between the two species, C. dubliniensis is much less virulent and less prevalent than C. albicans. The ability to change morphological phenotypes is a striking feature of Candida species and is linked to virulence. In this study, we report a novel phenotype, the gray phenotype, in C. dubliniensis. Together with the previously reported white and opaque cell types, the gray phenotype forms a tristable phenotypic switching system in C. dubliniensis that is similar to the white-gray-opaque tristable switching system in C. albicans. Gray cells of C. dubliniensis are similar to their counterparts in C. albicans in terms of several biological aspects including cellular morphology, mating competence, and genetic regulatory mechanisms. However, the gray phenotypes of the two species have some distinguishing features. For example, the secreted aspartyl protease (Sap) activity is induced by bovine serum albumin (BSA) in gray cells of C. albicans, but not in gray cells of C. dubliniensis. Taken together, our results demonstrate that the biological features and regulatory mechanisms of white-gray-opaque tristable transitions are largely conserved in the two pathogenic Candida species.

PMID: 26714067 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]