Duration of treatment for candidemia and risk for late-onset ocular candidiasis.

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Duration of treatment for candidemia and risk for late-onset ocular candidiasis.

Infection. 2012 Dec 2;

Authors: Blennow O, Tallstedt L, Hedquist B, Gårdlund B

Abstract
PURPOSE: Few reports have been published on the optimal duration of treatment of ocular candidiasis. We have investigated the incidence of late-onset Candida chorioretinitis and endophthalmitis in patients with candidemia who did not initially receive an ophthalmologic examination. The aim was to determine the duration of initial antifungal treatment that may be sufficient to avoid this complication. METHODS: This was a long-term follow-up study of 144 patients with candidemia who survived for at least 60 days after the onset of candidemia. The frequency of early- and late-onset ocular complications due to candida infection and factors associated with ocular candidiasis were investigated. RESULTS: Fundoscopy was performed on 60 patients, revealing 12 cases of ocular candida infection (20 %). Risk factors were infection with Candida albicans compared to other Candida species (p = 0.021) and surgery due to solid tumor (p = 0.004). Only one case of late-onset ocular candidiasis occurred among the 84 candidemic patients who did not receive an initial ophthalmologic examination. For unknown reasons, this patient had received only 2 days of systemic antifungal treatment initially. CONCLUSIONS: No case of late-onset ocular candidiasis was detected in unexamined patients who received at least 14 days of antifungal treatment. Based on our results, it would appear that the recommended 2 weeks of treatment after the first negative blood culture are sufficient to avoid late-onset complications due to undiscovered Candida chorioretinitis in patients surviving for more than 60 days after the onset of candidemia.

PMID: 23212461 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]