Electrochemistry-mass spectrometry for in-vitro determination of selected chemotherapeutics and their electrochemical products in comparison to in-vivo approach.

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Electrochemistry-mass spectrometry for in-vitro determination of selected chemotherapeutics and their electrochemical products in comparison to in-vivo approach.

Talanta. 2016 Nov 1;160:694-703

Authors: Szultka-Mlynska M, Buszewski B

Abstract
Chemotherapeutics are among the most frequently prescribed medications in modern medicine. They are widely prescribed; however, problems with organisms developing resistance to these drugs means that their efficacy may be lost, so care should be taken to avoid unnecessary prescription. It is therefore of great interest to study the detailed metabolism of these biologically active compounds. This study aimed at developing an efficient analytical protocol for the determination of in-vitro electrochemical products of selected antibiotic drugs (amoxicillin, cefotaxime, fluconazole, linezolid, metronidazole and moxifloxacin). Combination of electrochemistry (EC) and mass spectrometry (MS) was applied for the in-vitro determination of the studied antibiotics and their electrochemical products. To identify the structure of the detected electrochemical products, MS/MS experiments were performed. This was one of the first applications of the EC system for generation of electrochemical products produced from antibiotic drugs. Adjustment of appropriate conditions and such parameters as the potential value, mobile phase (pH), working electrode and temperature had significant influence on electrochemical simulations and the creation of selected derivatives. Consequently, several working electrodes were evaluated for this purpose. In most of the studied cases, mainly two types of products were observed. One corresponded to an increase in mass by 14Da, which can be explained by a process consisting of oxidation (+16 m/z) and dehydrogenation (-2 m/z); The second in turn showed mass reduction by 14Da, which can be attributed to the loss of -CH2 as a result of N-demethylation. The performed experiments consisted of two stages: electrochemical oxidation of the analyzed samples (phase I of metabolic transformation), and addition of glutathione (GSH) for follow-up reactions (phase II conjunction). The electrochemical results were compared to in-vivo experiments by analyzing urine samples from patients after antibiotic drugs have been administered.. Overall, the comparison of electrochemistry to in-vivo experiments shows the high potential of EC-MS as a fast analytical tool in the prediction of electrochemical conversion that could be applied to therapeutic drug monitoring and pharmacokinetic studies as well.

PMID: 27591665 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]