Posaconazol

  • Cutaneous candidiasis in Tehran-Iran: from epidemiology to multilocus sequence types, virulence factors and antifungal susceptibility of etiologic Candida species.

    Cutaneous candidiasis in Tehran-Iran: from epidemiology to multilocus sequence types, virulence factors and antifungal susceptibility of etiologic Candida species.

    Iran J Microbiol. 2019 Aug;11(4):267-279

    Authors: Sadeghi G, Ebrahimi-Rad M, Shams-Ghahfarokhi M, Jahanshiri Z, Ardakani EM, Eslamifar A, Mousavi SF, Razzaghi-Abyaneh M

    Abstract
    Background and Objectives: Cutaneous candidiasis is a multipicture fungal infection caused by members of the genus Candida which is considered as a public health problem all over the world with urgency of effective treatment and control. This study was performed to analyze the clinical epidemiology and molecular aspects of cutaneous candidiasis in Tehran-Iran in relation to antifungal susceptibility and virulence factors of etiologic Candida species.
    Materials and Methods: Candida species were isolated from skin (27.3%) and nail scrapings (72.7%) of suspected patients and identified by ITS sequencing. Phylogeny of the isolates was evaluated using multilocus sequence typing (MLST) and antifungal susceptibility and virulence factors of the isolates were determined in relation to clinical presentation.
    Results: Candida albicans was the most prevalent species (39.8%), followed by C. parapsilosis (32.9%), C. orthopsilosis (10.4%), C. tropicalis (7.9%), C. glabrata and C. guilliermondii, each (4.5%). Molecular typing of 35 C. albicans isolates by MLST revealed 28 novel sequence types with 11 singletons with 80.0% new diploid sequence types (DSTs). Majority of the isolates were susceptible to amphotericin B (91.5%), followed by posaconazole (90.3%), fluconazole (84.3%), itraconazole (74.1%), caspofungin (53.6%), and voriconazole (26.8%). Biofilm formation, yeast-to-hyphae transformation and phospholipase activity were reported species-dependent.
    Conclusion: Our results demonstrated clinical epidemiology of various Candida species from cutaneous candidiasis distributed in new molecular types with increasing importance of drug resistant of non-albicans Candida species. Our results showed that drug susceptibility and genetic variability of Candida species may be attributed to their clinical features and source of isolation.

    PMID: 31719957 [PubMed]


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  • Intravenous and Oral Posaconazole Pharmacokinetics in a Five-Year-Old With Mucor: A Case Report and Review of the Literature.

    Intravenous and Oral Posaconazole Pharmacokinetics in a Five-Year-Old With Mucor: A Case Report and Review of the Literature.

    J Pediatr Pharmacol Ther. 2019 Nov-Dec;24(6):528-533

    Authors: Ruland MO, Egelund TA, Ng JS, Bradfield SM, Egelund EF

    Abstract
    Posaconazole is a lipophilic triazole antifungal that exhibits variable absorption when administered orally. It possesses a broad spectrum of activity against various fungi, such as Aspergillus and traditionally resistant molds such as Rhizopus and Mucor, which carry a poor prognosis. Unfortunately, the tablet and suspension formulations of posaconazole are Food and Drug Administration approved for treatment of fungal diseases only in patients older than 13 years of age. Furthermore, the approval of the IV formulation is exclusively for adult patients. Nevertheless, the extended spectrum of activity and available dosage forms make it an attractive option for pediatric use. The data that exist to guide dosing of posaconazole in young pediatric patients are limited primarily to case series and case reports. Thus, we recommend therapeutic drug monitoring to ensure both safety and efficacy in pediatric patients. Herein we describe our experience with both oral and IV posaconazole in the salvage therapy of a 5-year-old female with extensive cutaneous Mucor. In contrast to previous reports, which show larger doses may be necessary to obtain therapeutic concentrations in pediatric patients as compared with adults, our patient reached targeted concentrations with weight-based dosing.

    PMID: 31719815 [PubMed]


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