Identification of Enterococcus faecalis in a patient with urinary-tract infection based on metagenomic next-generation sequencing: a case report.

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Identification of Enterococcus faecalis in a patient with urinary-tract infection based on metagenomic next-generation sequencing: a case report.

BMC Infect Dis. 2020 Jul 02;20(1):467

Authors: Li M, Yang F, Lu Y, Huang W

Abstract
BACKGROUND: Urinary tract infection (UTI) caused by various pathogenic microorganisms is ubiquitous in the parts of the urinary system such as kidney, ureter, bladder, and urethra. Currently, clinical detection of UTI is mainly focused on urine culture; however, the diagnostic value of urine culture remains limited due to the time-consuming procedure and low detection rate, especially in patients who have used antibiotics. Generally, treatment for UTI relies on empirical medication rather than pathogen diagnosis, which leads to the inappropriate use of antimicrobial agents and a significant increase in resistant strains. Comparatively, metagenomic next-generation sequencing (mNGS) is capable of overcoming the disadvantages of clinical culture, and identifying pathogens for further treatment.
CASE PRESENTATION: A 33-year-old male patient was admitted to hospital with a high fever and chills. None of his autoimmune disease or thyroid function related indicators were positive, and he had no risk of endocarditis. His white blood cell count, C-reactive protein, procalcitonin, interleukin 6, and neutrophil proportion were markedly elevated. He was initially diagnosed as having an infection of unknown etiology. Since empirical treatment of Sulperazon and Metronidazole did not relieve his symptoms, both the blood and urine specimens were examined using traditional culture, serological testing, and mNGS assay. Traditional culture and serological testing produced negative results, while the mNGS assay revealed the presence of a potential pathogen, Enterococcus faecalis, in the urine specimen, which was further confirmed by both Sanger sequencing and qPCR analysis. A CT scan of the patient's whole abdomen showed stones in the right kidney. Once targeted antibiotic therapy was administered, the patient recovered quickly.
CONCLUSIONS: Our case illustrated that mNGS, as a novel culture-independent approach, demonstrated the capability of rapid, sensitive, and accurate pathogen identification. Furthermore, this technology provides strong support for guiding clinicians to determine appropriate treatment.

PMID: 32615925 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]