Immediate versus deferred empirical antifungal (IDEA) therapy in high-risk patients with febrile neutropenia: a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, multicenter study.

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Immediate versus deferred empirical antifungal (IDEA) therapy in high-risk patients with febrile neutropenia: a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, multicenter study.

Eur J Clin Microbiol Infect Dis. 2012 Dec 28;

Authors: Maschmeyer G, Heinz WJ, Hertenstein B, Horst HA, Requadt C, Wagner T, Cornely OA, Löffler J, Ruhnke M, on behalf of the IDEA study investigators

Abstract
Empirical antifungal therapy is widely used in high-risk neutropenic hematology patients with fever persisting for more than 4 days. This clinical trial assessed whether immediate empirical therapy with voriconazole could lower the rates of invasive fungal infections (IFIs) compared with this approach. In a double-blind, placebo-controlled, multicenter study, patients with acute leukemia undergoing chemotherapy or allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) recipients were randomized to broad-spectrum antibacterial therapy plus voriconazole (immediate) or placebo (deferred) after the onset of neutropenic fever. If fever persisted for 96 h, patients were switched to open-label intravenous voriconazole; oral treatment was permitted after 96 h. The primary endpoint was the rate of proven/probable IFIs between Days 2 and 28 after fever onset in the modified intent-to-treat (mITT) complete-case population. One hundred and forty-seven patients were randomized to immediate (n = 81) or deferred (n = 66) voriconazole. In the mITT population, six patients in the immediate group and nine in the deferred group developed proven/probable IFI between Days 2 and 28 (p = 0.258). The safety profiles were similar in both groups. While immediate empirical therapy with voriconazole appears to be safe in febrile neutropenic high-risk patients, it was not associated with a significant reduction in IFIs compared with therapy deferred for 96 h after fever onset.

PMID: 23271674 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]