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Impact of Asymptomatic Bacteriuria Incidence and Management Post-Kidney Transplantation.

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Impact of Asymptomatic Bacteriuria Incidence and Management Post-Kidney Transplantation.

Clin Transplant. 2019 Apr 30;:e13583

Authors: Bohn BC, Athans V, Kovacs CS, Stephany BR, Spinner ML

Abstract
OBJECTIVE: Urinary tract infections (UTIs) are the most commonly occurring infectious complication following kidney transplantation. Questions remain regarding whether asymptomatic bacteriuria (ASB) should be treated. The aim was to evaluate the incidence and management of ASB in kidney transplant recipients at a large academic medical center.
METHODS: All subjects receiving an isolated kidney transplant between September 2012 and October 2016, and with at least one ASB episode were included. Demographics, symptomatology, and urine culture data were collected on subjects with bacteriuria in the first year post-transplant. Cultures were classified by symptoms, ASB treatment trends were analyzed, and ASB-to-UTI progression was compared between ASB treatment and non-treatment.
RESULTS: A total of 527 subjects were transplanted with 64 developing at least one ASB episode. The incidence of ASB was 12.1% and treated 74.6% of the time. Neither lack of ASB treatment (p=0.463) nor ASB within the first month post-transplant (p=0.303) were associated with ASB-to-UTI progression.
CONCLUSION: Despite high ASB treatment rate, this was not found to be protective against ASB-to-UTI progression. ASB within the first month post-transplant also did not correlate with increased progression risk. These results suggest minimization of ASB treatment in kidney transplant recipients remains an important antimicrobial stewardship target. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

PMID: 31038773 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]