Indoor Finish Material Influence on Contamination, Transmission, and Eradication of Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA).

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Indoor Finish Material Influence on Contamination, Transmission, and Eradication of Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA).

HERD. 2020 Aug 31;:1937586720952892

Authors: Harris D, Taylor KP, Napierkowski K, Zechmann B

Abstract
OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study was to evaluate environmental surface materials used in healthcare environments for material composition, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) viability, and a comparison of two disinfectants, a bleach germicidal cleaner and Decon7, a novel disinfectant.
BACKGROUND: Contaminated environmental surfaces have been associated with outbreaks of healthcare-associated illness (HAIs). One in every 20 patients in U.S. acute care hospitals acquire a healthcare-associated illness, leading to consequences such as elevated morbidity, mortality, and a decrease in quality of life. In the patient environment, MRSA can remain viable from hours to up to 14 days.
METHODS: Environmental surface materials were evaluated as new and worn. Material composition and properties were assessed to evaluate surface integrity and the influence on the disinfection of MRSA. Inoculated materials were used to assess MRSA viability over time and the efficacy of a manufacturer's recommended cleaning and disinfection product compared to a novel disinfectant.
RESULTS: Environmental surface materials respond differently in appearance and roughness, when mechanically worn. When measuring MRSA survival, at 24 hr, MRSA colony forming unit (CFU) counts were reduced on the copper sheet surface and solid surface with cupric oxide. By 72 hr, all MRSA counts were zero. Bleach and the novel disinfectant were equally effective at disinfecting MRSA from all surface types.
CONCLUSIONS: This study highlights a gap in knowledge about the impact of type and wear of environmental surface materials used in healthcare environments on contamination with epidemiologically important organisms. In conclusion, environmental surface material wear, properties, and cleaning and disinfection efficacy are important factors to consider when addressing HAIs.

PMID: 32867539 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]