Invasive Candida albicans fungal infection requiring explantation of a noncrosslinked porcine derived biologic mesh: a rare but catastrophic complication in abdominal wall reconstruction.

Icon for PubMed Central Related Articles

Invasive Candida albicans fungal infection requiring explantation of a noncrosslinked porcine derived biologic mesh: a rare but catastrophic complication in abdominal wall reconstruction.

Can J Surg. 2020 Nov-Dec;63(6):E533-E536

Authors: Ober I, Nickerson D, Caragea M, Ball CG, Kirkpatrick AW

Abstract
SUMMARY: Biologic mesh is preferred over synthetic mesh for complex and contaminated abdominal wall repairs; however, there are very little data on the risks and complications associated with its use. We report the case of a 67-year-old man with failed synthetic mesh repair for recurrent ventral hernia, who subsequently required an abdominal wall reconstruction (AWR), including the intraperitoneal sublay of noncrosslinked biologic mesh. His postoperative course was complicated with catastrophic sepsis and sustained hemodynamic instability, responding only to mesh explantation. The biologic mesh was subsequently noted to be histologically infected with invasive Candida albicans. Although noncrosslinked biologic mesh is a valuable adjunct to AWR, it is not infection-resistant. Although it is rare, infection of any foreign tissue, including biologic mesh, can occur in the setting of complex ventral abdominal wall repairs. Clinicians should be watchful for such infections in complex repairs as they may require biologic mesh explantation for clinical recovery.

PMID: 33211643 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]