Modeling operational quality metrics and costs of long-acting antibiotics for ABSSSI treatment in the emergency department.

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Modeling operational quality metrics and costs of long-acting antibiotics for ABSSSI treatment in the emergency department.

J Med Econ. 2019 Mar 06;:1

Authors: Keyloun K, Lofgren E, Hebert S

Abstract
AIMS: To model implementation of a new treatment pathway leveraging long-acting antibiotics (LAs) for treatment of acute bacterial skin and skin structure infections (ABSSSIs) in a hospital emergency department (ED) with an observation unit, and to quantify health resource utilization and economic outcomes versus standard care (intravenous vancomycin).
MATERIALS AND METHODS: Discrete-event simulation was used to model implementation of the LA treatment pathway in the ED versus standard care from the US Medicare perspective. Model inputs were derived from published sources to simulate a real-world hospital ED with an observation unit. Outcomes included key ED metrics such as patient throughput rate and length of stay (LOS) and cost (estimated through reimbursed amounts in 2017 USD).
RESULTS: Implementation of an LA pathway in the ED improved ABSSSI patient throughput rate by 350% (+5.8 dispositions/ED and observation unit day) and reduced LOS by 68% (-7.2 hours/patient). These improvements in patient outcomes are driven by the reduced infusion time required for LA antibiotics and are greater for dalbavancin than oritavancin owing to the shorter infusion duration (30 minutes vs 3 hours).
LIMITATIONS: External validity of the model was not assessed. The model was limited to care received in EDs; therefore, certain clinical variables outside the ED were not captured for this analysis.
CONCLUSIONS: LA pathway implementation for ABSSSI treatment in the ED supported improved efficiency, which may translate to economic value. As EDs continue to focus on improving key metrics such as throughput rate and LOS, LA pathway implementation should be considered as a potential approach for abbreviated ABSSSI treatment in the ED.

PMID: 30838908 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]