Necrotizing fasciitis caused by Mucor indicus in a pediatric bone marrow transplant recipient.

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Necrotizing fasciitis caused by Mucor indicus in a pediatric bone marrow transplant recipient.

Pediatr Transplant. 2018 Sep 23;:e13294

Authors: Bloch D, Gonzalez MD, Haight A, Abramowsky C, Yildirim I

Abstract
Necrotizing fasciitis is a life-threatening, rapidly progressing infection of fascia and subcutaneous cellular tissue typically caused by mixed aerobic and anaerobic bacteria. We present a case report of an immunocompromised 4-year-old female with necrotizing fasciitis from a rare fungal organism, Mucor indicus. The patient underwent multiple debridements and was treated for 10 months, first on liposomal amphotericin B (2 months) then posaconazole (8 months). Mucor indicus is a rarely described pathogen with only nine other cases described. Identification of this organism remains a challenge, and the need for further understanding of risk factors and organism susceptibility testing to help guide treatment is crucial.

PMID: 30246483 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]