PBPK modeling of CYP3A and P-gp substrates to predict drug-drug interactions in patients undergoing Roux-en-Y gastric bypass surgery.

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PBPK modeling of CYP3A and P-gp substrates to predict drug-drug interactions in patients undergoing Roux-en-Y gastric bypass surgery.

J Pharmacokinet Pharmacodyn. 2020 Jul 24;:

Authors: Chen KF, Chan LN, Lin YS

Abstract
Roux-en-Y gastric bypass surgery (RYGBS) is an effective surgical intervention to reduce mortality in morbidly obese patients. Following RYGBS, the disposition of drugs may be affected by anatomical alterations and changes in intestinal and hepatic drug metabolizing enzyme activity. The aim of this study was to better understand the drug-drug interaction (DDI) potential of CYP3A and P-gp inhibitors. The impacts of RYGBS on the absorption and metabolism of midazolam, acetaminophen, digoxin, and their major metabolites were simulated using physiologically-based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) modeling. PBPK models for verapamil and posaconazole were built to evaluate CYP3A- and P-gp-mediated DDIs pre- and post-RYGBS. The simulations suggest that for highly soluble drugs, such as verapamil, the predicted bioavailability was comparable pre- and post-RYGBS. For verapamil inhibition, RYGBS did not affect the fold-change of the predicted inhibited-to-control plasma AUC ratio or predicted inhibited-to-control peak plasma concentration ratio for either midazolam or digoxin. In contrast, the predicted bioavailability of posaconazole, a poorly soluble drug, decreased from 12% pre-RYGBS to 5% post-RYGBS. Compared to control, the predicted posaconazole-inhibited midazolam plasma AUC increased by 2.0-fold pre-RYGBS, but only increased by 1.6-fold post-RYGBS. A similar trend was predicted for pre- and post-RYGBS inhibited-to-control midazolam peak plasma concentration ratios (2.0- and 1.6-fold, respectively) following posaconazole inhibition. Absorption of highly soluble drugs was more rapid post-RYGBS, resulting in higher predicted midazolam peak plasma concentrations, which was further increased following inhibition by verapamil or posaconazole. To reduce the risk of a drug-drug interaction in patients post-RYGBS, the dose or frequency of object drugs may need to be decreased when administered with highly soluble inhibitor drugs, especially if toxicities are associated with plasma peak concentrations.

PMID: 32710209 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]