Posaconazole levels in patients taking the delayed-release tablet versus the oral suspension: a retrospective comparison.

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Posaconazole levels in patients taking the delayed-release tablet versus the oral suspension: a retrospective comparison.

Antimicrob Agents Chemother. 2015 Jun 8;

Authors: Durani U, Tosh PK, Barreto JN, Estes LL, Jannetto PJ, Tande AJ

Abstract
INTRODUCTION: While posaconazole prophylaxis decreases the risk of invasive fungal infection compared to fluconazole, decreased bioavailability of the oral suspension formulation limits its efficacy. A new delayed-release tablet formulation demonstrated an improved pharmacokinetic profile in healthy volunteers. However, serum levels for the two formulations have not been compared in clinical practice. This study compared achievement of therapeutic posaconazole levels in patients taking the delayed-release tablet to those taking the oral suspension.
METHODS: This retrospective cohort study included 93 patients initiated on posaconazole between 2012 and 2014 and had at least one serum posaconazole level measured. The primary measure was the proportion of patients achieving an initial therapeutic level (> 700 ng/mL).
RESULTS: An initial therapeutic posaconazole level was seen in 29 of 32 (91%) patients receiving tablets and 37 of 61 (61%) patients receiving suspension (p = 0.003). Among patients with a steady state level measured 5 to 14 days after initiation, a therapeutic level was observed in 18 of 20 (90%) patients receiving tablets and 25 of 43 (58%) patients receiving suspension (p = 0.01). In these patients, the median posaconazole level of the tablet cohort (1655 ng/mL) was twice that of the suspension cohort (798 ng/mL) (P=0.004).
CONCLUSIONS: In this cohort study, the improved bioavailability of posaconazole delayed-release tablets translates into a significantly higher proportion of patients achieving therapeutic serum levels, compared to the oral suspension. The results of this study strongly support the use of delayed-release tablets over suspension in patients at risk for invasive fungal infection.

PMID: 26055378 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]