Ready-to-eat dairy products as a source of multidrug-resistant Enterococcus strains: Phenotypic and genotypic characteristics.

Icon for Elsevier Science Related Articles

Ready-to-eat dairy products as a source of multidrug-resistant Enterococcus strains: Phenotypic and genotypic characteristics.

J Dairy Sci. 2020 Mar 17;:

Authors: Chajęcka-Wierzchowska W, Zadernowska A, García-Solache M

Abstract
The enterococci are ubiquitous bacteria able to colonize the human and animal gastrointestinal tracts and fresh and fermented food products. Their highly plastic genome allows Enterococcus spp. to gain resistance to multiple antibiotics, making infections with these organisms difficult to treat. Food-borne enterococci could be carriers of antibiotic resistance determinants. The goal of this work was to study the characteristics of Enterococcus spp. in fermented milk products from Poland and their antibiotic resistance gene profiles. A total of 189 strains were isolated from 182 dairy products out of 320 samples tested. The predominant species were Enterococcus faecium (53.4%) and Enterococcus faecalis (34.4%). Isolates were resistant to streptomycin (29.1%), erythromycin (14.3%), tetracycline (11.6%), rifampicin (8.7%), and tigecycline (8.1%). We also detected 2 vancomycin-resistant and 3 linezolid-resistant strains; however, no vanA or vanB genes were identified. A total of 57 high-level aminoglycoside resistance strains (30.2%) were identified, most of which have the ant(6')-Ia gene, followed by the aac(6')-Ie-aph(2″)-Ia and aph(3″)-IIIa genes. Resistance to tetracycline was most often conferred by tetM and tetL genes. Macrolide resistance was most frequently encoded by ermB and ermA genes. Conjugative mobile genetic element (transposon Tn916-Tn1545) was identified in 15.3% of the strains, including 96.3% of strains harboring the tetM gene. This study found that enterococci are widely present in retail ready-to-eat dairy products in Poland. Many isolated strains are antibiotic resistant and carry transferable resistance genes, which represent a potential source of transmission of multidrug-resistant bacteria to humans.

PMID: 32197843 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]