Redundant Anaerobic Antimicrobial Prescriptions in German Acute Care Hospitals: Data from a National Point Prevalence Survey.

Related Articles

Redundant Anaerobic Antimicrobial Prescriptions in German Acute Care Hospitals: Data from a National Point Prevalence Survey.

Antibiotics (Basel). 2020 May 28;9(6):

Authors: Aghdassi SJS, Gastmeier P, Behnke M, Hansen S, Kramer TS

Abstract
Despite limited indications, redundant anaerobic antimicrobial prescriptions (RAAPs) are frequent. The objective of this study was to assess the prevalence and characteristics of RAAPs in German acute care hospitals. In a retrospective data analysis, antimicrobial prescriptions from a point prevalence survey on antimicrobial use in German acute care hospitals in 2016 were analyzed and RAAPs were identified. RAAPs were defined as a patient simultaneously receiving any of the following combinations: Penicillin/beta-lactamase inhibitor (PenBLI) plus clindamycin; PenBLI plus metronidazole; PenBLI plus moxifloxacin; PenBLI plus carbapenem; carbapenem plus clindamycin; carbapenem plus metronidazole; carbapenem plus moxifloxacin; clindamycin plus metronidazole; clindamycin plus moxifloxacin; and metronidazole plus moxifloxacin. Data from 64,412 patients in 218 hospitals were included. Overall, 4486 patients (7%) received two or more antimicrobials. In total, 441 RAAP combinations were identified. PenBLI plus metronidazole was the most common anaerobic combination (N = 166, 38%). The majority of RAAPs were for the treatment of community-acquired (N = 258, 59%) infections. Lower respiratory tract infections (N = 77; 20%) and skin/soft tissue infections (N = 76; 20%) were the most frequently recorded types of infections. RAAPs are common in German hospitals. Reducing redundant antimicrobial coverage should be a key component of future antimicrobial stewardship activities.

PMID: 32481490 [PubMed]