Risk factors of invasive candidiasis in critical cancer patients after various gastrointestinal surgeries: A 4-year retrospective study.

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Risk factors of invasive candidiasis in critical cancer patients after various gastrointestinal surgeries: A 4-year retrospective study.

Medicine (Baltimore). 2019 Nov;98(44):e17704

Authors: Xia R, Wang D

Abstract
For early diagnosis and treatment of invasive candidiasis (IC), the well-known risk factors may not apply in the intensive care unit (ICU). This retrospective study identified the risk factors predicting IC and candidemia in cancer patients under intensive care after gastrointestinal surgery.Enrolled were 229 cancer patients admitted to our oncology surgical ICU after gastrointestinal surgery between January 1, 2010 and October 31, 2014.The most common types of solid gastrointestinal cancers were gastric (49.8%), colon (20.1%), and esophageal (18.3%). The percentage of patients with corrected Candida colonization index (CCI) ≥0.4 was 31.9%. IC was confirmed in 19 patients (8.3%), and the ICU mortality was 15.8%. Candida albicans accounted for 52.6% of the total number of pathogenic Candida isolates. Among patients with CCI ≥0.4, the cancers with the highest prevalence were cardiac (45%) and gastric (36%), with ICU mortalities of 20% and 4.9%, respectively. For the diagnosis of candidemia, (1-3)-β-D-glucan (BDG) ≥80 pg/mL showed a sensitivity and specificity of 25% and 82.7%, respectively, positive and negative predictive values 6.7% and 95.7%, and area under the receiver operating characteristic curve 0.512. CCI ≥0.4 was the only significant predictor of IC, and number of organ failures was the only predictor of candidemia (P = .000 and .026).CCI ≥0.4 was the only significant risk factor predicting IC, with greater prediction of intra-abdominal candidiasis but failure to predict candidemia. Blood culture and BDG detection are recommended to supplement diagnosis. Patients may have multifocal and high-grade Candida colonization after cardiac surgery, and; therefore, are at high risk of IC, which should be taken seriously.

PMID: 31689800 [PubMed - in process]