Risk Factors of Multidrug Resistant Pathogens Induced Infection in Severe Acute Pancreatitis.

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Risk Factors of Multidrug Resistant Pathogens Induced Infection in Severe Acute Pancreatitis.

Shock. 2019 May 08;:

Authors: Li X, Li L, Liu L, Hu Y, Zhao S, Sun J, Wang G, Hai X

Abstract
PURPOSE: A retrospective study was first performed to assess the multidrug resistant (MDR) pathogen in severe acute pancreatitis (SAP) patients who were treated using the step-up approach. We aim to assess the risk factors between MDR pathogen and potential covariates in SAP patients.
METHODS: The clinical data of 51 SAP patients who were treated from June, 2013 to December, 2016 were retrospectively collected. A total of 23 patients in the MDR group and 28 patients in the non-MDR group were reviewed. The risk factors for MDR pathogen-induced infections in SAP patients were analyzed.
RESULTS: Hyperlipidemia was the leading cause of SAP in our study. The mean duration of hospital stay was significantly longer in the patients with MDR pathogen infections (P=0.0135). The hospitalization expenses of MDR group were much higher than those in non-MDR group. The mortality of MDR group (56.5%) was higher than that in non-MDR group (28.6%) (P=0.0436). Gram-negative isolates (63.8%) were commonly detected in SAP patients. Acinetobacter baumannii was the most common MDR pathogens. Systemic disease (P = 0.0136), initial use of carbapenem (P = 0.0438), and open necrosectomy (P = 0.0002) were the potential risk factors for MDR pathogen-induced infections in SAP. Furthermore, the logistic regression analysis revealed that open necrosectomy was the independent variable for MDR infections (OR: 15.6, 95% CI: 2.951-82.469, P = 0.0012).
CONCLUSIONS: MDR pathogen-induced infections were common in SAP patients and Acinetobacter baumannii was the main pathogen. Meanwhile, open necrosectomy was the independent risk factor for the infection of MDR pathogen.This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-Non Commercial-No Derivatives License 4.0 (CCBY-NC-ND), where it is permissible to download and share the work provided it is properly cited. The work cannot be changed in any way or used commercially without permission from the journal. http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0.

PMID: 31390337 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]