Structural variations of the cell wall precursor lipid II and their influence on binding and activity of the lipoglycopeptide antibiotic oritavancin.

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Structural variations of the cell wall precursor lipid II and their influence on binding and activity of the lipoglycopeptide antibiotic oritavancin.

Antimicrob Agents Chemother. 2015 Feb;59(2):772-81

Authors: Münch D, Engels I, Müller A, Reder-Christ K, Falkenstein-Paul H, Bierbaum G, Grein F, Bendas G, Sahl HG, Schneider T

Abstract
Oritavancin is a semisynthetic derivative of the glycopeptide antibiotic chloroeremomycin with activity against Gram-positive pathogens, including vancomycin-resistant staphylococci and enterococci. Compared to vancomycin, oritavancin is characterized by the presence of two additional residues, a hydrophobic 4'-chlorobiphenyl methyl moiety and a 4-epi-vancosamine substituent, which is also present in chloroeremomycin. Here, we show that oritavancin and its des-N-methylleucyl variant (des-oritavancin) effectively inhibit lipid I- and lipid II-consuming peptidoglycan biosynthesis reactions in vitro. In contrast to that for vancomycin, the binding affinity of oritavancin to the cell wall precursor lipid II appears to involve, in addition to the D-Ala-D-Ala terminus, other species-specific binding sites of the lipid II molecule, i.e., the crossbridge and D-isoglutamine in position 2 of the lipid II stem peptide, both characteristic for a number of Gram-positive pathogens, including staphylococci and enterococci. Using purified lipid II and modified lipid II variants, we studied the impact of these modifications on the binding of oritavancin and compared it to those of vancomycin, chloroeremomycin, and des-oritavancin. Analysis of the binding parameters revealed that additional intramolecular interactions of oritavancin with the peptidoglycan precursor appear to compensate for the loss of a crucial hydrogen bond in vancomycin-resistant strains, resulting in enhanced binding affinity. Augmenting previous findings, we show that amidation of the lipid II stem peptide predominantly accounts for the increased binding of oritavancin to the modified intermediates ending in D-Ala-D-Lac. Corroborating our conclusions, we further provide biochemical evidence for the phenomenon of the antagonistic effects of mecA and vanA resistance determinants in Staphylococcus aureus, thus partially explaining the low frequency of methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) acquiring high-level vancomycin resistance.

PMID: 25403671 [PubMed - in process]