The Association Between the Frequency of Interruptions in Antibiotic Exposure and the Risk of Health Care-Associated Clostridiodes difficile Infection.

The Association Between the Frequency of Interruptions in Antibiotic Exposure and the Risk of Health Care-Associated Clostridiodes difficile Infection.

Curr Ther Res Clin Exp. 2020;93:100600

Authors: Song J, Cohen B, Liu J, Larson E, Zachariah P

Abstract
Background: Although antibiotic use is an established risk factor for health care-associated Clostridiodes difficile infection, estimates of the association between infection and antibiotic use vary, depending upon how antibiotic exposure is measured.
Objectives: The purpose of this study was to explore the association between the frequency of interruptions in antibiotic exposure and the risk of health care-associated C difficile infection.
Methods: A retrospective chart review cohort study was conducted of all inpatients between 2011and 2016 from a single academic health center who received at least 1 dose of a systemic antibacterial for a cumulative duration of >3 days and ≤30 days. The measures of antibiotic exposure examined were duration-cumulative total calendar days of antibiotics therapy-and continuity-the frequency of interruptions in antibiotic exposure that was defined as the number of antibiotic treatment courses.
Results: A total of 52,445/227,967 (23%) patients received antibacterial therapy for >3 days and ≤30 days during their hospitalization. Of these, 1161 out of 52,445 (2.21%) were patients with health care-associated C difficile infection. An adjusted multivariable logistic regression analysis revealed that the risk of C difficile increased with longer cumulative days (odds ratio = 2.7; comparison of >12 days to ≤5 days) and fewer interruptions of antibiotic treatment (odds ratio = 0.78; comparison of >3 discrete antibiotic treatment courses to 1 course or continuous antibiotic treatment course; all P values < 0.05).
Conclusions: For patients who received the same number of cumulative days of therapy, the patients who had more frequently interrupted courses of antibiotic therapy were less likely to experience health care-associated C difficile infection. (Curr Ther Res Clin Exp. 2020; 81:XXX-XXX).

PMID: 32904045 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]