The nurses’ role in antimicrobial stewardship: A scoping review.

The nurses' role in antimicrobial stewardship: A scoping review.

Int J Nurs Stud. 2020 Sep 09;113:103772

Authors: van Huizen P, Kuhn L, Russo PL, Connell CJ

Abstract
BACKGROUND: The role of nurses in antimicrobial stewardship is understated and not well understood. Nurses can have a significant impact on the development of antimicrobial resistant bacteria in hospitals and the wider community through their management of intravenous antibiotics.
OBJECTIVE: To investigate the nurse's role in antimicrobial stewardship and examine best practice for preparing, administering and disposing of intravenous antibiotics.
METHODS: A systematically conducted scoping review was used. Seven databases were searched for published articles. Retrieved articles were screened for eligibility against pre-set inclusion and exclusion criteria with eligible full-text articles included in the synthesis. Reference lists of eligible articles and social media were reviewed to identify further sources of literature.
RESULTS: Forty-three sources of evidence were included. The extracted data indicate that a part of the nurse's role in antimicrobial stewardship is to monitor judicious antibiotic prescribing practices. Other than literature related to medication errors, there was limited research describing best practice when preparing, administering and disposing of intravenous antibiotics. There was also little evidence of consistent policy, guidelines and education for nurses' practice related to antimicrobial stewardship.
CONCLUSIONS: The evidence for best practice when nurses prepare, administer and dispose of intravenous antibiotics in hospitals is scarce. When nurses use best practice to manage intravenous antibiotics, the risk of antimicrobial resistant bacteria developing is minimised. The role of nurses in antimicrobial stewardship needs to be supported through education and evidence-based guidelines. Tweetable abstract: Nurse work practices may prevent the development and spread of antimicrobial resistant bacteria.

PMID: 33080476 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]