Trends in burden of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis in countries, regions, and worldwide from 1990 to 2017: results from the Global Burden of Disease study

Infect Dis Poverty. 2021 Mar 6;10(1):24. doi: 10.1186/s40249-021-00803-w.

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Antituberculosis-drug resistance is an important public health issue, and its epidemiological patterns has dramatically changed in recent decades. This study aimed to estimate the trends of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB), which can be used to inform health strategies.

METHODS: Data were collected from the Global Burden of Disease study 2017. The estimated annual percentage changes (EAPCs) were calculated to assess the trends of MDR-TB burden at global, regional, and national level from 1990 to 2017 using the linear regression model.

RESULTS: Globally, the age-standardized rate (ASR) of MDR-TB burden including incidence, prevalence, death and disability-adjusted life years (DALYs) had pronounced increasing trends from 1990 to 1999, with the EAPCs were 17.63 [95% confidence interval (CI): 10.77-24.92], 17.57 (95% CI 11.51-23.95), 21.21 (95% CI 15.96-26.69), and 21.90 (95% CI 16.55-27.50), respectively. Particularly, the largest increasing trends were seen in areas and countries with low and low-middle sociodemographic index (SDI). However, the trends in incidence, prevalence, death and DALYs of MDR-TB decreased globally from 2000 to 2017, with the respective EAPCs were - 1.37 (95% CI - 1.62 to - 1.12), - 1.32 (95% CI - 1.38 to - 1.26), - 3.30 (95% CI - 3.56 to - 3.04) and - 3.32 (95% CI - 3.59 to - 3.06). Decreasing trends of MDR-TB were observed in most regions and countries, particularly that of death and DALYs in Slovenia were - 18.96 (95% CI - 20.82 to - 17.06) and -19.35 (95% CI - 21.10 to - 17.55), respectively. Whereas the pronounced increasing trends of MDR-TB occurred in Papua New Guinea, Singapore, and Australia.

CONCLUSIONS: The ASR of MDR-TB showed pronounced decreasing trends from 2000 to 2017. However, the MDR-TB burden remains a substantial challenge to the TB control globally, and requires effective control strategies and healthcare systems.

PMID:33676581 | PMC:PMC7936417 | DOI:10.1186/s40249-021-00803-w