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Trends in resistant Enterobacteriaceae and Acinetobacter species in hospitalized patients in the United States: 2013-2017.

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Trends in resistant Enterobacteriaceae and Acinetobacter species in hospitalized patients in the United States: 2013-2017.

BMC Infect Dis. 2019 Aug 23;19(1):742

Authors: Gupta V, Ye G, Olesky M, Lawrence K, Murray J, Yu K

Abstract
BACKGROUND: Trends in antimicrobial resistance help inform infection control efforts. We examined trends in resistance for Enterobacteriaceae and Acinetobacter spp. from 2013 to 2017 in hospitalized US patients.
METHODS: We analyzed antimicrobial susceptibility of non-duplicate isolates in hospitalized patients (not limited to hospital-acquired infections) in the US BD Insights Research Database. Resistance profiles of interest were extended-spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL)-producing, multidrug resistant (MDR), and carbapenem-nonsusceptible (Carb-NS) phenotypes of Enterobacteriaceae, and MDR and Carb-NS Acinetobacter spp. Time series models were used to evaluate the patterns of resistance trends in rate per 100 hospital admissions and proportion per isolates tested.
RESULTS: More than 1 million Enterobacteriaceae isolates were obtained from 411 hospitals; 12.05% were ESBL, 1.21% Carb-NS, and 7.08% MDR. Urine was the most common source. For Acinetobacter spp. (n = 19,325), 37.48% were Carb-NS, 47.66% were MDR, and the most common source was skin/wound cultures. Trend analyses showed that the rates of ESBL and Carb-NS Enterobacteriaceae per 100 hospital admissions increased significantly between 2013 and 2017. Rates of MDR Enterobacteriaceae and Carb-NS and MDR Acinetobacter spp. decreased during this time period. Trends in proportions of resistant isolates generally mirrored trends in rates per 100 hospital admissions. MDR Enterobacteriaceae and Carb-NS and MDR Acinetobacter spp. were more common in winter than summer.
CONCLUSIONS: In this large-scale study of patients in US hospitals, rates of ESBL and Carb-NS Enterobacteriaceae per 100 hospital admissions increased between 2013 and 2017. MDR Enterobacteriaceae and MDR and Carb-NS Acinetobacter spp. isolates decreased over this period. These data support continuing infection control and stewardship efforts and the development of new therapeutic options.

PMID: 31443635 [PubMed - in process]