Twentieth-century emergence of antimicrobial resistant human- and bovine-associated Salmonella enterica serotype Typhimurium lineages in New York State.

Related Articles

Twentieth-century emergence of antimicrobial resistant human- and bovine-associated Salmonella enterica serotype Typhimurium lineages in New York State.

Sci Rep. 2020 Sep 02;10(1):14428

Authors: Carroll LM, Huisman JS, Wiedmann M

Abstract
Salmonella enterica serotype Typhimurium (S. Typhimurium) boasts a broad host range and can be transmitted between livestock and humans. While members of this serotype can acquire resistance to antimicrobials, the temporal dynamics of this acquisition is not well understood. Using New York State (NYS) and its dairy cattle farms as a model system, 87 S. Typhimurium strains isolated from 1999 to 2016 from either human clinical or bovine-associated sources in NYS were characterized using whole-genome sequencing. More than 91% of isolates were classified into one of four major lineages, two of which were largely susceptible to antimicrobials but showed sporadic antimicrobial resistance (AMR) gene acquisition, and two that were largely multidrug-resistant (MDR). All four lineages clustered by presence and absence of elements in the pan-genome. The two MDR lineages, one of which resembled S. Typhimurium DT104, were predicted to have emerged circa 1960 and 1972. The two largely susceptible lineages emerged earlier, but showcased sporadic AMR determinant acquisition largely after 1960, including acquisition of cephalosporin resistance-conferring genes after 1985. These results confine the majority of AMR acquisition events in NYS S. Typhimurium to the twentieth century, largely within the era of antibiotic usage.

PMID: 32879348 [PubMed - in process]