Ultrasound-enhanced fluorescence imaging and chemotherapy of multidrug-resistant tumors using multifunctional dendrimer/carbon dot nanohybrids.

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Ultrasound-enhanced fluorescence imaging and chemotherapy of multidrug-resistant tumors using multifunctional dendrimer/carbon dot nanohybrids.

Bioact Mater. 2021 Mar;6(3):729-739

Authors: Li D, Lin L, Fan Y, Liu L, Shen M, Wu R, Du L, Shi X

Abstract
Development of innovative nanomedicine enabling enhanced theranostics of multidrug-resistant (MDR) tumors remains to be challenging. Herein, we report the development of a newly designed multifunctional yellow-fluorescent carbon dot (y-CD)/dendrimer nanohybrids as a platform for ultrasound (US)-enhanced fluorescence imaging and chemotherapy of MDR tumors. Generation 5 (G5) poly(amidoamine) dendrimers covalently modified with efflux inhibitor of d-α-tocopheryl polyethylene glycol 1000 succinate (G5-TPGS) were complexed with one-step hydrothermally synthesized y-CDs via electrostatic interaction. The formed G5-TPGS@y-CDs complexes were then physically loaded with anticancer drug doxorubicin (DOX) to generate (G5-TPGS@y-CDs)-DOX complexes. The developed nanohybrids display a high drug loading efficiency (40.7%), strong y-CD-induced fluorescence emission, and tumor microenvironment pH-preferred DOX release profile. Attributing to the DOX/TPGS dual drug design, the (G5-TPGS@y-CDs)-DOX complexes can overcome the multidrug resistance (MDR) of cancer cells and effectively inhibit the growth of cancer cells and tumors. Furthermore, the introduction of US-targeted microbubble destruction technology was proven to render the complexes with enhanced intracellular uptake and anticancer efficacy in vitro and improved chemotherapeutic efficacy and fluorescence imaging of tumors in vivo due to the produced sonoporation effect. The developed multifunctional dendrimer/CD nanohybrids may represent an advanced design of nanomedicine for US-enhanced theranostics of different types of MDR tumors.

PMID: 33024894 [PubMed]